Nutrition Week

Written by rebeccah

It’s National Nutrition Week.

Around 91% of Australians do not include enough vegetables in their diet.

Eating enough veggies is important to keep us healthy and feeling good.

This week’s aim is Try for 5 serves of vegetables a day.

Light pink background. Green text in centre of image in a light green text bubble reads “National Nutrition Week”. Animated images of vegetables scattered across the picture including: Broccoli, carrot, red cabbage, pea pods, tomato, green cabbage, corn cob, mushroom, red capsicum, cos lettuce, beetroot, rocket and onion.

How much is one serve of vegetables?

One serve of veg is around the size of your fist – which can be 1/2 a potato, 1 medium tomato, 1 cup of salad or raw veg 0r 1/2 cup of cooked or frozen veg. 

How can we increase our vegetable intake?

  • Plan your meals ahead of time so when it’s time to eat you know what to make and can be sure you’ve included enough veggies.
  • Shop smart! Buy veggies that are in season or opt for frozen or canned vegetables that will last longer. Consider buying ‘imperfect’ vegetables that are often cheaper but provide the same nutritional value.
  • Try meal prepping! This reduces your chances of buying takeaway or opting for a meal without veggies.
  • Learn how to store your vegetables correctly so they last longer and you’re more likely to eat then and reduces your waste.
  • Try growing your own veggies!
  • Learn how to use every part of the vegetable!
  • Experiment: try different ways to prepare and eat your veggies, you might be surprised with what you like.
  • Find new recipes online.

Try for 5 serves of vegetables each day this National Nutrition Week!

Find more of our health tips here.

Book a Naturopathic, Chiropractic or Massage Therapy appointment with us here or call us on 9651 5559.

Source:

Nutrition Australia. Try for 5.  https://www.tryfor5.org.au/about-national-nutrition-week

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